Chicago Valentine’s Day Safety Tips

Chicago Valentine’s Day safety

A Valentine’s Day in Chicago can be filled with a variety of fun activities like romantic dinners or a cozy night in. Whatever your plans are, our Chicago personal injury lawyers hope they are full of love and not pain because of a personal injury like a car crash at one of Chicago’s most dangerous intersections. You can help ensure that you keep any planned celebrations as sweet as possible with these Chicago Valentine’s Day safety tips.

However, if something does go wrong, give Lerner and Rowe Injury Attorneys a call. We are available 24 hours a day, any day of the year—even on February 14th.

Top Chicago Valentine’s Day Safety Concerns

When it comes to Chicago Valentine’s Day safety, there are a number of potential risks, such as:  

Winter Weather

Chicago, like the rest of the Midwest, can experience severe weather extremes like bitter cold, massive snowfall, and even freezing rain. Winter weather in Chicago can contribute to many personal injuries like broken bones, spinal injuries, and more. 

Car Wrecks

Valentine’s Day is a busy day in Chicago with many couples heading out for dinner reservations or a romantic night out in the Windy City. That, coupled with increased traffic, winter weather, and icy road conditions, makes for dangerous driving conditions. Champagne and wine can make for an unforgettable Valentine’s Day, but can also lead to drunk driving car crashes.

Slips and Falls

A romantic walk through one of Chicago’s numerous scenic parks or streets is a memorable way to spend Valentine’s Day. However, winter weather can turn a romantic stroll into a catastrophic injury. Along with weather concerns, poorly maintained sidewalks, roads, and another’s negligence or recklessness further contribute to slip and fall injuries.

Pedestrian Accidents

As with any major city, Chicago has many pedestrians. On Valentine’s Day, with more people in general out and about, it is especially important to be aware of the risk of a pedestrian accident. Both drivers and pedestrians should be aware of this Chicago Valentine’s Day safety concern. 

Impaired Driving

Champagne and specialty cocktails can be a great way to toast a wonderful Valentine’s Day celebration. While you and your sweetheart might be responsible and not drive under the influence of alcohol or marijuana, it doesn’t mean others won’t. 

Fires and Burns

There’s nothing more romantic than a candlelit dinner for Valentine’s Day. If you’re going to set the mood with candlelight, make sure to be aware of the potential for fires and burn injuries. Additionally, candles and fireplaces at restaurants also pose a risk. Negligence or recklessness by the restaurant staff could lead to singed hair, clothes, and a severe burn injury.

Chicago Valentine’s Day Safety Tips 

Whether you’re going out to celebrate or having a cozy, romantic night in, here are vital Chicago Valentine’s Day safety tips that will help keep you safe from the concerns above.

Winter Weather

  • Before you head out, the weather forecasts to avoid getting caught in icy roads, snowstorms, or freezing rain.
  • Dress appropriately for the forecast.
  • Make sure you have a car emergency kit packed with winter essentials like extra winter clothing, non-perishable food, blankets, water, and a snow shovel in case you get stranded.
  • Clear and salt your sidewalks and pathways before leaving. 
  • If the weather is too treacherous, don’t feel bad about staying in or changing plans.

Car Wrecks

  • Allow extra time for travel to account for slower road conditions.
  • Maintain a safe distance between you and other vehicles. 
  • Avoid speeding and distracted driving

Slip and Falls

  • Watch out for uneven sidewalks and black ice, especially near scenic spots near water.
  • While those stilettos might look stunning, they can be hazardous on icy sidewalks. Opt for boots or flats with good traction.
  • Spilled drinks, wet floors, and uneven surfaces are common in restaurants. Walk carefully and report any potential hazards to staff.

Pedestrian Accidents

  • Be aware of your surroundings, especially when crossing streets.
  • Choose well-lit paths, and turn around if you encounter any dangers. 
  • Distracted walking can be just as dangerous as distracted driving. Don’t look at your phone while walking, especially during hazardous winter weather.
  • Use crosswalks and pedestrian signals. 
  • Make eye contact with drivers before crossing.

 Impaired Driving

  • Celebrate a Chicago Valentine’s Day responsibly. If you’re planning on drinking, designate a sober driver or use a taxi or rideshare service.
  • On the other hand, if you’re driving, drive defensively, as other people may drive under the influence. 
  • If you suspect any impaired drivers, pull over and report them to the police and get away from them as soon as possible. 

Fires and Burns

  • Never leave candles or a burning fire unattended. 
  • Keep candles away from decorations and flammable materials.
  • Make sure you have a working fire extinguisher handy at home.
  • Regularly check your smoke detector batteries
  • Never leave a stove or oven unattended. 
  • Use caution with hot oil and open flames.
  • Always use oven mitts and pot holders. 

Contact Our Chicago Personal Injury Lawyers

No matter how you celebrate Valentine’s Day this year, by knowing the top Chicago Valentine’s Day safety concerns, you can stay safe. We hope these Valentine’s Day safety tips help ensure that you have a very special and safe day. However, if you do suffer from a personal injury on February 14th in Chicago or a surrounding area, contact us 24/7 for a free consultation at 708-222-2222 or through our LiveChat feature. 

The sweetest surprise? You pay no fees until we win your case. Our team has a proven track record of billion dollar results. We are ready to fight for your compensation. 

The information on this blog is for general information purposes only. Nothing herein should be taken as legal advice for any individual case or situation. This information is not intended to create, and receipt or viewing does not constitute, an attorney-client relationship.